Tweet to Save a LIFE

Idol Fans & Twitterers Pave the Way

in the Fight Against Malaria

*** Now You Can Tweet To Save a Life***

NEW YORK, April 23 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — On this week’s American Idol “Idol Gives Back” episode, more than 20 million Americans tuned in to help raise almost $45 million for causes around the world. Malaria was one of them, and donations toward the cause are expected to climb in the days leading up to World Malaria Day on April 25.

Beginning today to honor World Malaria Day on Sunday, Malaria No More, the Case Foundation and Twitter are launching “End Malaria,” an effort geared to activate tweets from all over the world to help end malaria deaths in Africa. Mosquito nets save lives, and now, so do tweets.

Every thirty seconds a child dies from malaria in Africa. However, malaria is a completely preventable and treatable disease.

To show your support, please visit Hope140.org/EndMalaria and:

  • Retweet this message from @MalariaNoMore to make a $10 donation: RT: Malaria kills a child every 30 secs. Nets #endmalaria. So do RTs. RT2Give $10 http://rt2give.com/t/425
    • If you already have an account on RT2Give, you’ll receive a direct message asking for confirmation. If you don’t have an account, Twitpay will send you an @reply message with simple instructions on how to enroll.
  • Text ‘NET’ to 85944 to make a $10 donation to Malaria No More
    • A $10 donation will be charged to your mobile phone bill. Messaging and data rates may apply.
  • Add hashtag(s) #endmalaria#malaria#malariaday and/or #worldmalariaday to your tweets and the hashtags will trigger the addition of clickable mosquito icons to the tweet that will take you to Hope140.org/EndMalaria

To further promote positive change through Twitter, the Case Foundation is matching each $10 donation up to $25,000made through Twitpay’s RT2Give service and text-to-give, giving Twitterers and texters the power to double their efforts to end malaria deaths in Africa.

“Through a donation platform that enables people to move from activism to action, the End Malaria campaign takes a transformative next step in leveraging the power of Twitter to raise both awareness and important funding,” said Jean Case, CEO of the Case Foundation. “Malaria No More and Twitter have already proven the power of social media to ignite awareness, and the Case Foundation is honored to be a part of this important initiative.”

The “End Malaria” effort is an extension of last year’s World Malaria Day Twitter challenge between Ashton Kutcher and CNN for a race to 1 million followers. Kutcher’s pledge of $100,000 to Malaria No More catapulted him to success and helped provide Senegal with 89,724 life-saving mosquito nets.

“Malaria has finally met its match in this partnership between Malaria No More, the Case Foundation and Twitter,” said Scott Case, CEO of Malaria No More. “We know for a fact that tweets can translate into nets, and two villages in Senegal are living proof of that.”

This is the second time Twitter has tweaked its tweets for a cause. The first time was to honor World AIDS Day last December by turning tweets red for the RED campaign, which became the most retweeted initiative at the time.

“The difference between life and death can come down to a $10 bed net,” said Twitter co-founder Biz Stone. “The simple act of tweeting both donates to and promotes the important work of Malaria No More. By matching these donations, the Case Foundation transforms our tweets into a powerful force for good.”

Campaign details, Twitpay tweets and donation tracking are available at Hope140.org/EndMalaria.

About Malaria No More

Malaria No More is determined to end malaria deaths in Africa – and we’re helping the world get it done. Malaria No More leverages high-impact communications to engage the world, global advocacy to rally leadership and strategic investments to accelerate progress. For more information, visit www.MalariaNoMore.org, read our Buzzwords blog, fan our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter.

About Case Foundation

The Case Foundation, created by Steve and Jean Case in 1997, invests in people and ideas that can change the world. The Foundation champions initiatives that connect people, increase giving, and catalyze civic action. For more information, visit www.CaseFoundation.org.

*** Now You Can Tweet To Save a Life***

NEW YORK, April 23 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — On this week’s American Idol “Idol Gives Back” episode, more than 20 million Americans tuned in to help raise almost $45 million for causes around the world. Malaria was one of them, and donations toward the cause are expected to climb in the days leading up to World Malaria Day on April 25.

Beginning today to honor World Malaria Day on Sunday, Malaria No More, the Case Foundation and Twitter are launching “End Malaria,” an effort geared to activate tweets from all over the world to help end malaria deaths in Africa. Mosquito nets save lives, and now, so do tweets.

Every thirty seconds a child dies from malaria in Africa. However, malaria is a completely preventable and treatable disease.

To show your support, please visit Hope140.org/EndMalaria and:

  • Retweet this message from @MalariaNoMore to make a $10 donation: RT: Malaria kills a child every 30 secs. Nets #endmalaria. So do RTs. RT2Give $10 http://rt2give.com/t/425
    • If you already have an account on RT2Give, you’ll receive a direct message asking for confirmation. If you don’t have an account, Twitpay will send you an @reply message with simple instructions on how to enroll.
  • Text ‘NET’ to 85944 to make a $10 donation to Malaria No More
    • A $10 donation will be charged to your mobile phone bill. Messaging and data rates may apply.
  • Add hashtag(s) #endmalaria#malaria#malariaday and/or #worldmalariaday to your tweets and the hashtags will trigger the addition of clickable mosquito icons to the tweet that will take you to Hope140.org/EndMalaria

To further promote positive change through Twitter, the Case Foundation is matching each $10 donation up to $25,000made through Twitpay’s RT2Give service and text-to-give, giving Twitterers and texters the power to double their efforts to end malaria deaths in Africa.

“Through a donation platform that enables people to move from activism to action, the End Malaria campaign takes a transformative next step in leveraging the power of Twitter to raise both awareness and important funding,” said Jean Case, CEO of the Case Foundation. “Malaria No More and Twitter have already proven the power of social media to ignite awareness, and the Case Foundation is honored to be a part of this important initiative.”

The “End Malaria” effort is an extension of last year’s World Malaria Day Twitter challenge between Ashton Kutcher and CNN for a race to 1 million followers. Kutcher’s pledge of $100,000 to Malaria No More catapulted him to success and helped provide Senegal with 89,724 life-saving mosquito nets.

“Malaria has finally met its match in this partnership between Malaria No More, the Case Foundation and Twitter,” said Scott Case, CEO of Malaria No More. “We know for a fact that tweets can translate into nets, and two villages in Senegal are living proof of that.”

This is the second time Twitter has tweaked its tweets for a cause. The first time was to honor World AIDS Day last December by turning tweets red for the RED campaign, which became the most retweeted initiative at the time.

“The difference between life and death can come down to a $10 bed net,” said Twitter co-founder Biz Stone. “The simple act of tweeting both donates to and promotes the important work of Malaria No More. By matching these donations, the Case Foundation transforms our tweets into a powerful force for good.”

Campaign details, Twitpay tweets and donation tracking are available at Hope140.org/EndMalaria.

About Malaria No More

Malaria No More is determined to end malaria deaths in Africa – and we’re helping the world get it done. Malaria No More leverages high-impact communications to engage the world, global advocacy to rally leadership and strategic investments to accelerate progress. For more information, visit www.MalariaNoMore.org, read our Buzzwords blog, fan our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter.

About Case Foundation

The Case Foundation, created by Steve and Jean Case in 1997, invests in people and ideas that can change the world. The Foundation champions initiatives that connect people, increase giving, and catalyze civic action. For more information, visit www.CaseFoundation.org.

{story found at prnewswire}

Happy Birthday Youtube!

Youtube turns 5!

On Friday, YouTube celebrates the fifth anniversary of its first video posting, a modest tourism clip that would launch an Internet revolution. In that almost shockingly short time, the video site has become a verb, a logo used to help sell Casio cameras and the dominant player in its field several times over. It is almost everybody’s first resource for online video, the place we look for that clip we heard about and the place we, too often, lose ourselves in a chain of video distraction.

Because it is on the Internet and therefore infinitely measurable, it has also generated statistics galore. Here is an anniversary look at YouTube by (some of) the numbers:

sajohnson@tribune.com

19 In seconds, the length of the first video uploaded to YouTube, of co-founder Jawed Karim at San Diego Zoo.

Feb. 14, 2005 The date YouTube registered its domain name.

April 23, 2005 The date the first video was uploaded to YouTube.

1.96 million The number of times the first video has been played, as of midweek.

185.39 million The number of times the most popular video on YouTube, Lady Gaga’s “Bad Romance,” has been played.

252 In seconds, the average length of a YouTube video, according to Sysomos, a Toronto firm that analyzes social media.

24 Hours of video uploaded to YouTube each minute, a milestone reached in March 2009.1 billion Views per day, the almost ridiculously high popularity threshold the site says it reached in October 2009.

3.15 The factor by which YouTube’s number of unique monthly viewers (96.1 million) exceeds that of Yahoo (30.5 million), the second-place U.S. online video site in that category, according to Nielsen.

6.6 The factor by which YouTube’s number of monthly video streams served (4.67 billion) exceeds that of Hulu(707.5 million), the second-place site in that category, according to Nielsen.

$1.65 billion In dollars worth of stock, the amount Google paid to acquire YouTube in November 2006.

51 The number of languages into which Google’s automatic speech recognition technology can translate YouTube videos and create captions.

5 The maximum number of stars available in YouTube’s old on-site ratings system, replaced in the March redesign by a simpler “likes/dislikes” model.

1 Out of 100, the number of YouTube comments that actually have something interesting to say (this author’s estimate).

2 The number of “highest rated” comments YouTube lists immediately under videos, its recent attempt to fight its bad-comment problem.

68 Estimate of the number of parodies of the Hitler in the bunker scene from the film “Downfall” posted on YouTube and other sites, according to the Guardian.

April 2, 2010 The date news broke that YouTube was removing the “Downfall” parodies because of copyright concerns.

2.14 million The number of subscribers to NigaHiga’s channel of Asian-themed comedy videos, the most subscribed to on YouTube.

$30,000 The amount the video “David After Dentist,” of an incoherent little kid in the back seat of a car, has earned for its uploader through an ad revenue sharing program, according to YouTube.

60 The number of matches of the Indian Premier League cricket season YouTube will have streamed after it shows the final match live April 25, its biggest foray into free sports streaming.

31 The percent of YouTube videos embedded by bloggers that are music videos, according to a study by Sysomos.

14,600 The number of videos that comes up when you search for “kittens” on YouTube.

3,820 The number that comes up when you search for “trampoline accidents.”

{Source: Chicago Tribune}

Public Relations Ethics

Not only has Web 2.0 added additional layers of communication to the practice of public relations, but it seems that social media has introduced communicators to a new set of ethical challenges. In fact, this led to a series on pr-squared. During this week’s PR 2.0 Chat, we took an in-depth look at some potentially sticky situations.

Spend a few minutes thinking about these questions. What’s your thoughts?

  • Is ghostblogging ok or unethical?
  • What about ghost-tweeting? Fair game or unethical?
  • Do PR pros need to disclose when tweeting about client? If so, how?
  • Is it ever ok to delete a comment on a blog, FB page, etc? Why or why not?
  • Have you ever read the PRSA Code of Ethics? Do we need a SM Code?
  • Your boss asks you to withhold (or add) details in a press release — significantly altering the story. How do you respond?
  • A reporter calls looking for sensitive info. Is it acceptable or unethical to wait until his/her deadline passes to call back?
  • Your client is exaggerating claims about a new product’s benefits. What do you do?
  • Client accidentally misrepresents the facts during interview. What do you do? What if it’s a live interview?
  • How do you handle a Facebook fan w/ very strong opinions that disrupt the conversation? Is it OK to block that person?
  • Lines blur btwn PR & content creator. How do you handle clients who want coverage in your blog?
  • If long-time client breaks the law, are you obligated to continue representing?
  • If someone asks you to do something unethical, how do you respond?

{Source: prtini}

5 Unique Ways to Use Twitter for Business

Customer service, recruiting, contests, giveaways and promotions — these are all standbys for businesses usingTwitterTwitter as a medium to connect with customers and fans.

Given that Twitter as a platform supports nearly limitless applications for business use, we thought it time to highlight some of the newer Twitter-for-business opportunities that aren’t so obvious.

From pitching your followers and rewarding Twitter loyalty, to keeping a trained eye on the Twitterverse, targeting smaller communities, and adding metadata to tweets, here are some unique ways to use Twitter in your social business strategy.

  1. Pitch to your followers
  2. Reward loyalty
  3. Market Research
  4. Target Niche Audiences
  5. Add your own Metadata

Please read the full story here.

TMZ’s Harvey Levin “What’s a Pinot” at Dancing with the Stars Kate Gosselin question to Nuttin’ But Stringz

Los Angeles, CA – Just got off the phone with the manager of Nuttin’ But Stringz, who is stranded along with thousands of airline passengers in Europe due to the Iceland Volcano eruption. Not since 9-11 or Mount Saint Helens (May 18, 1980, Washington State) have so many planes been grounded. TMZ got an exclusive interview this week with Tourie and Damien Escobar, brothers who make up the internationally renown Nutt’ But Stringz, who performed live at Dancing with the  Stars on ABC. Taking a break from the show TMZ caught the urban rock violinists just outside the DWTS studios.

When asked who they thought was the best dancer? Both replied in harmony, “Kate Gosselin. She’s a good woman, a good Mom and the most sexy,”  Tourie and Damien answered.

TMZ’s Harvey Levin (shaking his head), back in the newsroom, was blown away when he heard Tourie Escobar ttell the TMZ news cameraman that He’s
” in love with Kate Gosselin, and would love to date her.”

When they asked who’s the sexiest Dancer on DWTS, both replied Kate Gosselin. “Kate is even sexier than Pamela Anderson,”  said Tourie.  She’s “Pinot.”

Levin, back in the newsroom said, “Now you’re losing me, what is Pinot?” Both
violinists answer, “A fine wine.”

To continue reading please check out the story.

{Source is included within the story}

Entertainment Publicists “Can’t Work Without Social Media”

Publicists who battled endless, speculative chatter of 24-hour cable — something that publicists of old never had to contend with before are now overwhelmed with social media of which they can’t work without it, according to the chatter at a recent Entertainment Publicists Professional Society (EPPS) mixer (1-27-10) in Culver City, CA.

When asked a year ago at an EPPS mixer in Hollywood how “new media is impacting the way they do business?,” more than 90 percent said they were not using it as much as they had hope to, because they were either “afraid of it,” or didn’t “understand it, yet.” Today it is a different story.  They say “It’s do or die.”

When Asked “Do you use social media today,” the response had changed to a big “yes.”

“Yes, I am using social media, because it brings in new clientele we did not have access to previously, and it’s inexpensive,” said Ann Simley of Communications Interchange, Inc., Beverly Hills, CA., who also won an O’Dwyer Directory of Public Relations door prize.

“Social media is very, very important, because you’re getting the word out, making people more aware of your product and new services,” said Tiffany Young, director of Sales and Marketing, Radisson Hotel in Whittier (Calif.). “It brings additional revenues and awareness for the entire brand of hotels.”

“I was in the convergence department at Rogers & Cowen so I pretty much did all new media, and they had just open a new media department when I arrived to do my internship,” said Stephanie Gonzalez, a Cal-State Northridge graduate, and budding publicist looking for a new job in 2010. She believes her social media training will give her the edge in trying to find a good job in public relations in the near future. “You have to either get in or get out of new media as there is no way around it at this point,” Gonzalez explained.

To continue reading please click on the rest of the story.

{Source is included within the story}

FACEBOOK Mobile Now Bigger than TWITTER

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Interesting headline I know…However, it’s not intended to be sensationalist, simply a matter of fact and also a topic worthy of discussion.

Facebook announced that active users of its mobile platform surpassed 100 million, each and every month. And, this usage happens on almost every carrier in the world.  If interaction and participation serve as the foundation for social media, then Facebook is setting the standard. Facebook is reporting that mobile users are twice more active on Facebook than non-mobile users.

According to estimates, the number of mobile Facebook users far exceeds the total active user base for Twitter, including mobile, Web, and through third-party applications.

This news also represents a concentric ring around another major milestone the company reached earlier this month.  On February 4th, the burgeoning social network celebrated its sixth anniversary as well as hosting more than 400 million users.

In a recent statement, Facebook voiced its dedication to mobile platforms…

Facebook’s goal is to enable our users to be able to stay connected and communicate with their friends whenever, wherever they are. To accomplish this we are working with every major operator and mobile device maker to ensure that users are able to access Facebook – through SMS, mobile web sites or an application – from the device of their choice.

To further improve the mobile experience, Facebook redesigned m.facebook.com and touch.facebook.com enabling people to access Facebook from any mobile browser in more than 70 languages.

Text messaging remains significant, with more then 80 operators in 32 countries enabling millions around the world to stay connected via SMS. The Facebook team also introduced FB.ME that makes it even easier for people to share content from their mobile devices.

Of course dedicated applications for Facebook remain paramount as smart phones gain traction within the marketplace. The network recently released updates for the dedicated Facebook applications on Android, Blackberry, iPhone, Nokia and Samsung and it also supports a broadening array of new devices from HTC, INQ, LG Electronics, Palm, Sony Ericsson and Microsoft’s Windows Phone.

Let’s quickly recap…

100 million active mobile users. 400 million total Facebook users. Facebook is truly gaining prominence all over the world.

While Twitter is seemingly stealing the real-time spotlight, Facebook is where brands, whether local, national, or global, should concentrate significant attention, creativity, and engagement. And with 100 million active users interacting with other Facebook contacts from their mobile devices, creating portable brand experiences is now predominant.

Why?

The social graph that each individual user builds within Facebook is unequaled in its design and effect.

The average user on Facebook has over 130 friends, sending eight friend requests per month. Individuals spend more than 55 minutes per day interacting with contacts while also exploring the activities of those defining their social graphs (which is exactly where brand opportunities reside).

More than 35 million users update their status each day with more than 60 million status updates posted daily.

More than 20 million people become fans of Pages each day.

Pages have created more than 5.3 billion fans.

At a time when businesses are rushing to create Facebook Fan Pages and Twitter profiles without necessarily calculating or defining goals, intentions, or targets, the question becomes, how are you optimizing your brand or story for the Facebook and also the Facebook mobile experience…?

Story found on PR website.

How PR Sold the War in the Persian Gulf

On August 2, 1990, Iraqi troops led by dictator Saddam Hussein invaded the oil-producing nation of Kuwait. Like Noriega in Panama, Hussein had been a US ally for nearly a decade. From 1980 to 1988, he had killed about 150,000 Iranians, in addition to at least 13,000 of his own citizens. Despite complaints from international human rights group, however, the Reagan and Bush administrations had treated Hussein as a valuable ally in the US confrontation with Iran. As late as July 25 – a week before the invasion of Kuwait – US Ambassador April Glaspie commiserated with Hussein over a “cheap and unjust” profile by ABC’s Diane Sawyer, and wished for an “appearance in the media, even for five minutes,” by Hussein that “would help explain Iraq to the American people.”69

Glaspie’s ill-chosen comments may have helped convince the dictator that Washington would look the other way if he “annexed” a neighboring kingdom. The invasion of Kuwait, however, crossed a line that the Bush Administration could not tolerate. This time Hussein’s crime was far more serious than simply gassing to death another brood of Kurdish refugees. This time, oil was at stake.

Viewed in strictly moral terms, Kuwait hardly looked like the sort of country that deserved defending, even from a monster like Hussein. The tiny but super-rich state had been an independent nation for just a quarter century when in 1986 the ruling al-Sabah family tightened its dictatorial grip over the “black gold” fiefdom by disbanding the token National Assembly and firmly establishing all power in the be-jeweled hands of the ruling Emir. Then, as now, Kuwait’s ruling oligarchy brutally suppressed the country’s small democracy movement, intimidated and censored journalists, and hired desperate foreigners to supply most of the nation’s physical labor under conditions of indentured servitude and near-slavery. The wealthy young men of Kuwait’s ruling class were known as spoiled party boys in university cities and national capitals from Cairo to Washington.70

Unlike Grenada and Panama, Iraq had a substantial army that could not be subdued in a mere weekend of fighting. Unlike the Sandinistas in Nicaragua, Hussein was too far away from US soil, too rich with oil money, and too experienced in ruling through propaganda and terror to be dislodged through the psychological-warfare techniques of low-intensity conflict. Waging a war to push Iraq’s invading army from Kuwait would cost billions of dollars and require an unprecedented, massive US military mobilization. The American public was notoriously reluctant to send its young into foreign battles on behalf of any cause. Selling war in the Middle East to the American people would not be easy. Bush would need to convince Americans that former ally Saddam Hussein now embodied evil, and that the oil fiefdom of Kuwait was a struggling young democracy. How could the Bush Administration build US support for “liberating” a country so fundamentally opposed to democratic values? How could the war appear noble and necessary rather than a crass grab to save cheap oil?

“If and when a shooting war starts, reporters will begin to wonder why American soldiers are dying for oil-rich sheiks,” warned Hal Steward, a retired army PR official. “The US military had better get cracking to come up with a public relations plan that will supply the answers the public can accept.”71

Steward needn’t have worried. A PR plan was already in place, paid for almost entirely by the “oil-rich sheiks” themselves.

To continue reading please check out the story.